Namibia

Namibia

Africa’s Conservation Success Story

Located on the Atlantic coast of Africa, Namibia is famous for its vast open landscapes. Its immensity of space is accentuated by the fact that it is the fifth largest country in Africa and yet one of the least populated. But diverse forms of life there is, from the Himba, one of the last true nomadic tribes on Earth, to the unique desert-adapted elephant and the bizarre Welwitchia plant.
 
Namibia is a country of startling contrasts that straddles two great deserts: the Namib, the oldest desert on the planet, and its sea of red sand lies along the Atlantic coastline, while in the eastern interior lies the Kalahari, a vast and sparsely vegetated savannah.
 
Over the years, there have been a number of cultural influences that have all added to the unique atmosphere of Namibia. At various times Germany, Britain and South Africa have all governed the territory, but it was with the eventual independence of Namibia in 1990 that the country was able to develop its multi-cultural character and reinvent itself.
 
The many national parks and game reserves boast a huge variety of wildlife in a kaleidoscope of differing environments: giraffes and elephants amble across the blinding white saltpans of Etosha National Park, gemsbok amble up steep red dunes at Sossusvlei, and thousands of seals colonize lonely beaches along the Skeleton Coast. Astonishing contrasts are everywhere for the visitor to savour and photograph.

Some of our Namibia Trips: